Geschichte des Vendee Globe

8.Vendee Globe Race 2016/17

http://www.vendeeglobe.org/en

Start 05.11.2016 in Les Sables De Olonne mit 29 Teilnehmern.

http://www.segel.de/oceanracing-2016/vendee-vor/index.html

Sieger Armel le Cleach mit Rekordzeit 74d 3h 35min

2. 1.Brite Alex Thomson mit 74d 19h 35min

Sieger Armel le Cleach und 1.Brite Alex Thomson 2017
Sieger Armel le Cleach und 1.Brite Alex Thomson 2017

7.Vendee Globe Race 2012/13

Vendee Globe Race 2012/13 Start 11.November Les Sables de Olonne , 20 Teilnehmer,

February 26, 2013
Fotogalerie

2012-2013 VENDEE GLOBE HIGHLIGHTS

The seventh edition of the Vendée Globe was a record-studded race (Youngest winner, smallest gap between the first two skippers, two sailors under 80 days, smallest gap between the first and the last skipper) that kept sailing enthusiasts on the edge of their seats for 104 days. Here is a week-by-week summary of the 2012-2013 edition of the greatest of the nonstop, single-handed, round-the-world races without assistance.

Week 1
Saturday, November 10. More than 300,000 people were out early in the morning to give the twenty skippers a warm sendoff despite the rainy and cold weather. Just like in any of the previous editions, the channel moment was an emotional one for the sailors embodying the public’s dreams of adventure. French actor François Cluzet gave the start signal at 1.02PM. Five overeager competitors (Gabart, De Pavant, Gutkowski, Le Cléac’h and Riou) crossed the start line early while Bertrand de Broc (Votre Nom autour du Monde avec EDM Projets), who had damaged his boat 25 minutes before the official start, was already back on the pontoons. He eventually left thirteen hours after the others and sailed across poor Marc Guillemot (Safran) who lost his keel after only 4h43 in the race. The Breton skipper was the first to pull out of the race. Young and spirited François Gabart (Macif) immediately took the lead of the fleet and sailed aggressively in a rough sea. Then, after three days of race, came the second abandon. Kito de Pavant (Groupe Bel) hit a fishing boat, ripping off his boomsprit and roof, while he was in the cabin for a ten-minute nap. The French sailor changed his route and sailed to Cascais, Portugal. Meanwhile, behind Gabart, Le Cléac’h (Banque Populaire) and Stamm (Cheminées Poujoulat) kept up with the leader’s intense rhythm, followed by Riou (PRB), who chose a more westerly route. This was the time for the very first tactical choices. That is when the youngest skipper in the fleet, Louis Burton, 27, also hit a fishing boat and decided to sail back to Les Sables d’Olonne to try to fix his damaged shroud. But Burton will eventually have to resign and pull out of the race. On the evening of Thursday, November 15, Samantha Davies (Savéol) dismasted in very rough weather conditions. She was the fourth sailor to pull out of the race and, after only one week, the Vendée Globe had already lost 20% of its fleet. Le Cléac’h became the new race leader off the Canary Islands, ahead of Gabart and Stamm. There are only 25 miles between the first three skippers and 100 miles between the first six.

Week 2
The remaining skippers were back in much nicer sailing conditions when, on November 17, Jérémie Beyou (Maître CoQ) broke his keel jack while sailing northwest of Cape Verde and eventually pulled out of the race two days later. On the same weekend, Alex Thomson (Hugo Boss) broke his rudder tie bar but managed to repair it without losing ground. Meanwhile, Javier Sanso (ACCIONA 100%EcoPowered) had to climb up his mast to fix his main sail traveller. The fleet was made up of three separate groups : the favourites (Le Cléac’h, Gabart, Dick, Stamm, Riou, Thomson), the senior outsiders (Golding, Wavre, Le Cam), and the « latecomers» (Boissières, De Lamotte, De Broc, Di Benedetto, Gutek, Sanso). On day 9, Le Cléac’h entered the infamous Doldrums, which gave the chasing skippers an opportunity to come back. That area of extremely unstable winds proved to be particularly tough on the leaders and their race became so close some skippers could actually see each other for a few hours! On November 21, after days of surprising route choices, Poland’s Zbigniew « Gutek » Gutkowski (Energa), abandons the race because of recurring autopilot issues. On the same day, Armel Le Cléac’h left the Doldrums behind and was the first skipper to cross the Equator. The chasing skippers followed him a few hours behind and closed the gap on him in the South Atlantic. Behind them, Mike Golding (Gamesa) crossed the Equator for the 22nd time and, after 12 days at sea, eight of the Vendée Globe skippers were in the south hemisphere, with Armel Le Cléac’h leading them for an entire week. Because of particularly southerly St Helena’s Highs, the first skippers had to choose a westerly route.

Week 3
On Saturday, November 24, Vincent Riou hit an Unidentified Floating Object – a massive drifting buoy – tearing the front part of PRB’s hull and seriously damaging the ourigger. After a first repair attempt, the former Vendée Globe winner eventually had to put an end to his race on the next day. Skippers‘ strategies were exposed as Jean-Pierre Dick (Virbac-Paprec 3) moved away from the direct route and sailed south, soon followed by François Gabart, while Armel Le Cléac’h continued on the initial route. Skippers at the back of the fleet, led by Jean Le Cam (SynerCiel) with Mike Golding and Dominique Wavre (Mirabaud), started closing the gap. 250 miles behind the Swiss, Javier Sanso found himself 150 miles ahead of Arnaud Boissières (AKENA Vérandas).

Week 4
The different options chosen by the skippers started showing results on November 30, when the leader himself admitted the southerly route may have been the best. Dick briefly took the lead of the race on December 1, just before entering the « Great South » from Armel Le Cléac’h, who had led since November 16. In the process, the Virbac-Paprec skipper set a new 24-hour record, covering more than 500 miles – 502! – in a day. But François Gabart was the one crossing the first of the eight ice gates first. The leaders – Le Cléac’h, Gabart, Dick and Stamm – regrouped with Thomson 100 miles behind them while the pendant que les « senior sailors » tried to keep up with the rhythm 400 miles behind the front runners. On December 2, Jean Le Cam noticed a net was caught up in his keel and decided to dive to release it. The complex operation was a success and became one of the unforgettable moments in the race. On Monday, December 3, Armel Le Cléac’h was the first to round the Cape of Good Hope after 22d23h46′ of race, beating the previous record, set by Vincent Riou in 2004, by more than 24 hours. Finally, it was Indian Ocean time!
The leaders‘ speed in such strong wind widened the gap between the frontrunners and the chasing skippers, with 2,200 miles (4,000 kilometres) between the leaders and the last skipper. The former tried to sail as fast as they possibly can to avoid the anticyclone threatening to catch up with them, which turned out to be difficult because of a tricky cross sea. While Armel Le Cléac’h was heading north to cross the ice gates, his opponents chose a curvier southerly route, despite the risk of coming across ice. Behind them, the « senior sailors » were in a close fight – Dominique Wavre and Jean Le Cam even sailed at sight for a few hours on December 7. Armel Le Cléac’h might have been the first to cross the Crozet gate, the anticyclone ended up catching up with him and the Banque Populaire skipper gave up his leadership position to Gabart and then to Stamm, before taking it back a few days later while the other skippers were forced to head north to cross the mandatory gate.

Week 5
Armel Le Cléac’h took the lead on December 8th. Once the second ice gate was passed, the weather conditions were suitable for speed records with a strong northwesterly wind that pushed leaders on a little formed sea. François Gabart was the fastest in that speed game and shattered the 24 hours record with 534.48 miles… Incredible! He took the opportunity to take over the lead, and two days later, he set a new record: the best time ever achieved between Les Sables d’Olonne and Cape Leeuwin (34d10h23′). The duel with Le Cléac’h looked like a match-race as the distance between the two leaders was reduced to its minimum compared the entire Vendée Globe journey… Therefore, it was increasingly difficult for their rivals to follow them, particularly for Bernard Stamm, who faced several problems with his mainsail boards, and a very unlucky Alex Thomson, who hit two UFOs in less than 24 hours, which destroyed his hydrogenerator, damaged his rudder and broke another rudder tie bar. Only Jean-Pierre Dick managed to stay in the leaders‘ wake. While crossing the Amsterdam gate, the MACIF skipper was only 20 minutes ahead, after 24,000km of sailing! At the end of the fifth week, Gabart, Le Cléac’h and Dick managed to stay in the same weather conditions while, behind them, Thomson and Stamm stalled. Then the gap with the leaders grew quickly; respectively 500 and 600 miles. While the first skippers arrived at the Cape Leeuwin, Alessandro Di Benedetto (Team Plastique) crossed the Cape of Good Hope on December 12, 2012…

Week 6
In the cold weather conditions, the entire Vendée Globe fleet was then sailing in the Southern Ocean. Seeing the pace at the forefront, it was difficult to imagine the leading men were in any kind of discomfort. Yet they kept their pace up, trapped in a duel where the tiniest slowdown was immediately punished. Gabart was the first to make his entry into the Pacific Ocean. Maximizing their weather systems, with a slightly higher speed and perfect navigation, the two leaders continued to increase their lead.

Week 7
As Christmas was approaching, the pace didn’t falter and the two leaders continued their global duel under New Zealand. As he entered the Pacific Ocean, Le Cléac’h managed to take over the lead before seeing Gabart regained control before the rankings changed with each of the skippers‘ jibes. A little more than 500 miles behind, Dick became a bit stalled and stayed between the head of the fleet and the Anglo-Swiss duo Thomson-Stamm, about 900 miles behind the front runners. For Christmas, Le Cléac’h got to the first West Pacific gate first and temporarily took over the lead. For Stamm, Christmas was much tougher since he had to divert to New Zealand in order to find a shelter and make some repair on his hydrogenerators. He was almost out of energy and couldn’t consider crossing the Pacific, the largest ocean in the world, in these conditions. The deterioration of the weather conditions forced him to moor to a Russian ship, which resulted in a complaint procedure against the sailor, who had received assistance in the operation. When the Swiss skipper resumed his journey towards Cape Horn, he was in 10th position, just behind Arnaud Boissières who, after a difficult start, had managed to come back in the Southern ocean. Meanwhile, the two leaders were slowed down and saw Dick and Thomson come back in their wake. On December 28th, only Di Benedetto had not yet entered the Pacific, sailing about 4,000 miles away from the head of the fleet.

Week 8
Even when the leaders were somehow slowed down while approaching Cape Horn, their nearest competitor, Jean-Pierre Dick, remained 400 miles away when they rounded the legendary rock on January 1st, 2013. Gabart rounded it first and was only 1:15h ahead of Le Cléac’h. But skippers would have to wait some more for some relief as the way down towards the extreme south of the Chilean archipelago was made under the threat of icebergs believed to have drifted all the way up to Staten Island. At the same time, Di Benedetto entered the Pacific Ocean. A little less than two days later, Dick rounded the last cape of the race, 250 miles before Thomson. We then had to wait for six and a half days to see Le Cam coming back into the Atlantic. He opened the way to a squad that had grown in the Southern Seas. Stamm, Boissières and Sanso had joined the „senior sailors“ crew and the newly-formed group was then sailing within 500 miles of each other. The skipper of Cheminées Poujoulat, victim of another crash that had badly damaged his hydrogenerators, while the other one was no longer working, was forced to make diesel refuel after Cape Horn. It meant he was out of the race just before the jury confirmed his disqualification.

Week 9 – Week 11
Even if Cape Horn was now behind them, the route was still long and if the leaders had then left the Southern Seas, they quickly faced winds of 45 knots and 6-metre swell. For the leading trio, the way up the Atlantic began abruptly and cruelly for Dick, who – after a great comeback on the leading duo – had to slow down in order to repair his main stay. For Le Cléac’h, the problems were less dramatic but equally disastrous in terms of consequences. A problem with his gennaker in the Le Maire Strait made him lose ground again when he managed to return on Gabart, only 10 miles behind him. On January 6th, a shift in the west he thought beneficial became a real nightmare, as the crossing became more complicated than expected. 100 miles away, on January 8th, the gap extended over 260 miles six days later. This would be the largest gap in the race. Through less easy doldrums crossing for the young leader, Le Cléac’h managed to come back a little, but it wasn’t enough.

Finish
On January 27th, 2013, at 15h28 (French Time), François Gabart crossed the finish line and entered the Sables d’Olonne channel as a hero, after an incredible duel that lasted 78d02h26′ or 28,646 miles travelled at an amazing average speed of 15.3 knots. Only 3:17h later, Armel Le Cléac’h completed his world circumnavigation, just in time to enter the channel, still warmed by the enthusiasm of a great public. It was definitely a historic day, which saw the finishes of two exceptionally gifted young sailors, the first to single-handedly sail around the world on a monohull in less than 80 days. Two days later, Alex Thomson takes the third place of the podium thanks to an amazing performance on a second-generation boat built in 2007. The British was indeed helped by Dick’s technical issues, as the Virbac Paprec skipper finished 4th after sailing 2,650 miles without the keel he had lost 600 miles south of the Azores archipelago. The Atlantic proved to be very rough to the « senior sailors » and the first of them, Jean Le Cam, did not enter the Sables d’Olonne channel before February 6, followed by Mike Golding and Dominique Wavre. Then came Arnaud Boissières and Bertrand De Broc as well as, a little later, Tanguy de Lamotte (Initiatives-cœur). The last skipper to finish the race was Alessandro Di Benedetto, 11th but still celebrated as if he had won the race. Even though he was in 9th position when he crossed the Equator, Javier Sanso was not that lucky. On February 3, he lost his keel 400 miles south of the Azores, which capsised his boat. The Spaniard was eventually rescued by the Portuguese navy.

Vendée Globe 2012-2013 final leaderboard
1- François Gabart (FRA/MACIF) 78d 02h 18′
2- Armel Le Cléac´h (FRA/Banque Populaire) 78d 05h 33′ (+3h27′)
3- Alex Thomson (GBR/Hugo Boss) 80d 19h 23′ (+2d 13h 49′)
4- Jean-Pierre Dick (FRA/Virbac-Paprec 3) 86d 03h 03′ (+8d 00h 47′)
5- Jean Le Cam (FRA/SynerCiel) 88d 00h 12′ (+9d 21h 56′)
6- Mike Golding (GBR/Gamesa) 88d 06h 36′ (+10d 04h 19′)
7- Dominique Wavre (SUI/Mirabaud) 90j 03h 14′ (+12d 00h 58′)
8- Arnaud Boissières (FRA/AKENA Vérandas) 91d 02h 09′ (+12d 23h 52′)
9- Bertrand de Broc (FRA/Votre Nom autour du Monde avec EDM Projets) 92d 17h 10′ (+14d 14h 53′)
10- Tanguy de Lamotte (FRA/Initiatives-coeur) 98d 21h 56′ (+20d 19h 39′)
11- Alessandro Di Benedetto (FRA-ITA/Team Plastique) 104d 02h 34′ (+26d 00h 17′)

Not ranked
Bernard Stamm (SUI/Cheminées Poujoulat), disqualified
Did not finish
Marc Guillemot (FRA/Safran): Lost keel on November 10
Kito de Pavant (FRA/Groupe Bel): Hit a fishing boat on November 12
Louis Burton (FRA/Bureau Vallée): Hit a fishing boat on November 14
Sam Davies (GBR/Savéol): Dismasted on November 15
Jérémie Beyou (FRA/Maître CoQ): Broken keel jack issue on November 17
Zbigniew Gutkowski (POL/ENERGA) : Autopilot issue on November 21
Vincent Riou (FRA/PRB): Hit an UFO on November 24
Javier Sanso (ESP/ACCIONA 100% EcoPowered): Capsised on February 3

http://www.segel.de/oceanracing-2012/vendeeglobe-2012/index.html    

Sieger F. Gabart – 2. Armel Le Cleach 3h 27min dahinter !

Sam Davies Mastbruch am 15.11. im Atlantik


6.Vendee Globe Race 2008/09

Start. 9.November 2008 Les Sables de Olonne

February 01. 2009 at 08:48

Michel Desjoyeaux’s first treat for the waiting crowds
in the Vendée Globe finish town of Les Sables d’Olonne has been to offer them the luxury of a Saturday night to let their hair down complete in the knowledge that their champion elect is now unlikely to arrive before the middle of Sunday afternoon.

While the Vendée town enjoyed a lively evening, Desjoyeaux was struggling to make it through a high pressure ridge. The shore-side fans were taking their evening aperitifs when The Professor was slowed back to just two knots at one stage. Since then his speed has picked up on Foncia, making a steady 10-11 knots in SE’ly winds which will back to give him strong headwinds and a likely finish time of between 1500hrs and 1900hrs GMT. At 0630hrs GMT he had 82 miles to the finish line.

For him this morning his final sunrise over the Atlantic. To the east an orange glow appears timidly attempting to warm up the atmosphere. Soon it will be re-entry time. The culture shock from lonely soloist to instant celebrity at the epicentre of the jubilations. Yesterday was the time for washing, shaving and making himself look presentable. Foncia toohas to be tidied up. So the damage cannot be hidden – there are stanchions missing after they were used to repair the rudder. On the bowsprit there are signs of lamination work. But inside at least, the boat can return to her pristine condition with all the bags neatly stowed. The dirty laundry and rubbish bags are hidden away out of view of the visitors. A final breakfast. Time to enjoy a hot coffee this morning, as there is no hurry. Everything will be ready for this evening’s tide

Soon it will be time for the first words to the waiting world, where every word will be listened to as if the gospel truth. To the north a small trawler from the Isle of Yeu or from a Breton port. Just another chance encounter between the sailor and those who earn their livelihood on the sea, but the concentration reindexs right up to the finishing line.

If Desjoyeaux has felt a few pangs of frustration they are a world away from the difficulties of his friend Roland Jourdain who reindexs in second place, some 130-150 miles from the Azores. headwinds are hampering the progress of Veolia Environnment towards the island haven and this morning Bilou is course making a NE’ly when the most suitable islands lie almost due north. Meantime Armel Le Cléac’h has freed Brit Air from the Azores high pressure and this morning is making 11-13 knots to Veolia Environnement’s 4.6 knots. Brit Air is now under 400 miles behind Bilou.

Marc Guillemot’s Safran has been consistently quicker than Roxy in recent hours and Sam Davies has been forced to concede 18 miles of her lead, Safran likely now to be into a more ideal power band for her double reefed configuration as the trade winds strengthen a little. Roxy is still 84 miles ahead and making 11.7 knots to Safran’s 13.

Brian Thompson, GBR, (Bahrain Team Pindar) makes steady progress in the trades also and has steadily squeezed up on Safran. Now just 262 miles behind Guillemot, he most now fancy his chances when the duo in front start to hit the Azores high pressure system.

Dee Caffari’s Doldrums have presented her with some of the most frustrating hours of her race. She has lost over 150 miles to Thompson and this morning is now 266 miles behind Bahrain Team Pindar. At 0330hrs GMT this morning her yellow Open 50 was scarcely moving, but since then she has managed to make a few knots speed to the NW.

Since 1500hrs yesterday she had made only 40 miles, including no fewer than seven tacks or gybes plus countless sail changes.

Steve White is now 390 miles off the Brasilian coast still making a steady nine knots, passing the latitude of Rio. Strategically, like others in these realms of the fleet, White is not getting the level of weather information to judge his best options, to plot the arrival of fronts and so he is keeping well offshore. So too, Rich Wilson behind him, is often reduced to working from first principles, but the Great American III is the fastest boat in the fleet this morning, creaming along at 13.4 knots. And Raphael Dinelli, the skipper from Olonne sur Mer, has less than 30 hours to run to Cape Horn with the Austrian skipper Norbert Sedlacek now 133 miles behind him.

 

 

http://www.segel.de/oceanracing-2008/vendee-globe-2008/index.html

Sieger: Michel Desjoyeaux auf Foncia zum 2.Mal

Shootingstar: Sam Davies/Roxy 4.Platz


5.Vendee Globe Race 2004/05

Start 7.November 2004 in Les Sables de Olonne, 23 Teilnehmer

Sieger Vincent Riou/PRB

Ständiger Rivale an der Spitze seit Start  Le Cam/Bonduelle

Vendee Globe – das ultimative Abenteuer des Segelsports
Fotogalerie
Tagesberichte

Von Les Sables d’Olonne nach Osten, entlang der drei großen Kaps, rund um Welt und zurück nach Les Sables d’Olonne. Alles Einhand-Nonstop und ohne Assistenz.
1966 vollendete Sir Francis Chichester auf seiner Gipsy MothII die Welt in 226 Tagen – mit nur einem stoppover in Sydney.
In den 70ern fielen die bisherigen Rekorde, die Bootstechnologie entwickelte sich weiter – ebenso die Vorbereitungen der Skipper. 1970 segelte erstmals der Engländer Chay Blyth von Ost nach West , d.h. gegen Wind und Welle. 1973 war Alain Colas der erste Skipper auf einem Multihull-Boot und schaffte es in 169 Tagen. 1989 drückte der Amerikaner Dodge Morgan diesen Rekord auf 150 Tage herunter. Doch dann brach der Franzose Philippe Monet diesen Rekord abermals mit seiner Brest-to-Brest-time von 129 Tagen. 1989 segelte Olivier de Kersauson den Kurs trotz einiger Mißgeschicke in 125 Tagen.

Das ließ die Briten nicht ruhen, die parallel hierzu 1982 den BOC Challenge kreierten – ein neues Einhand-Round-the-world-Race mit Einrumpfyachten, bei dem vier stopovers in Newport- The Cape – Sydney und Rio eingelegt wurden. Ein Newcomer, Philippe Jeantot, ließ alle anderen auf jedem Streckenabschnitt hinter sich und kam nach 159 Tagen- 11 Tage vor seinem nächsten Konkurrenten am Ziel an.
1986 wiederholte Jeantot beim zweiten BOC Challenge seinen Erfolg. In einer feucht-fröhlichen Nacht entschieden sie sich einmütig eines Tages auf ihren eigenen Booten, nonstop und ohne Assistenz diesen schönen Planeten zu umsegeln. Jeantot hat diesen Traum Wirklichkeit werden lassen, in dem Mensch und Maschine bis ans Limit beansprucht werden und in dem er selbst erfolgreich war.
Das erste Rennen hatte 13 Teilnehmer in Les Sables am Start, von denen nur sieben das Rennen nach den Regeln beendeten. Der Gewinner, Tituan Lamazou schaffte es in 109 Tagen.

Im November 1992 starteten 14 Männer zum zweiten Rennen und wieder beendeten nur sieben diese Herausforderung – Alan Gaultier siegte in 110 Tagen, doch wurde die Siegesfeier überschattet durch den Verlust von Nigel Burgess einen Monat nach dem Start. Dieses Unheil wiederholte sich 1996. Gerry Rouls blieb auf See, 3 wurden gerettet, weniger als die Hälfte schaffte es zum Zielhafen, doch der Sieger stellte mit 105 Tagen einen neuen Rekord auf und Catherine Chabaud war die erste Frau, die dieses Rennen beendete.

Vom Vendee Globe 2000/2001 hat SEGEL.DE – im täglichen email-Kontakt mit dem Shoreteam von Ellen Mac Arthur – ausführlich und mit Fotogalerie berichtet. Die damals 24-jährige Elllen Mac Arthur ging als Zweite – 24 Stunden hinter dem Sieger – dem „Professor“ Michel Desjoyeaux – nach 94 Tagen durchs Ziel und wurde damit nicht nur die jüngste und schnellste Solo-Weltumseglerin sondern auch die neue Heldin der Briten, der die gesamte Schuljugend zujubelte und welche die Queen mit einem Teegespräch und dem Titel MBE (Member of Empire) ehrte.

Nun jährt sich das legendäre Vendee Globe zum 5.Mal und startet mit 20 Skippern am 7.November 2004 wieder von Les Sables d’Olonne aus.
Die zwischenzeitliche rasante Entwicklung der weltweiten elektronischen Übertragungsmöglichkeiten von Berichten, Bild und Ton versprechen – auch dank der bedeutenden Zahl von Internetnutzern – ein hochinteressantes und spannendes Rennen an den Grenzen menschlichen und technischen Könnens.

off. Skipperliste
mit Bootsnamen und Nummer
Einführung von Initiator Philip Jeantot
Geschichte des Vendee Globe
Idealkurs und waypoints
Fachbegriffe und Redensarten
Medizinische Betreuung

Die Gewinner der vergangenen Vendee Globe Rennen
2000-2001 Michel Desjoyeaux on PRB
1996-1997 Christophe Auguin on GEODIS
1992-1993 Alain Gautier on BAGAGES SUPERIOR
1989-1990 Titouan Lamazou on ECUREUIL D’AQUITAINE

VINCENT RIOU/PRB ist der Gewinner des VENDEE GLOBE 2004
Start: Sonntag 07.November 2004, 1202 GMT
Ziel: Mittwoch 02. Februar 2005, 2249 GMT
Rennzeit für 23,680 nm: 87 Tage, 10h, 47min und 55sec – 11,28kn
Vorheriger Rekord: Michel Desjoyeaux/PRB Vendee Globe 2000/01: 92 Tage, 03h, 57min und 32sec.

Etappenzeiten von Vincent Riou (PRB):
Start-Äquator: 10 Tg, 14 h, 58 min
Start- Kap d.g. Hoffnung: 24 Tg, 02 h, 18 min
Start – Cape Leeuwin: 36 Tg, 12 h, 48 min
Start- Cape Horn: 57 Tg, 08 h, 43 min
Start-Äquator(Rückweg): 72 Tg, 13 h, 58 min

 

 

http://www.segel.de/oceanracing-2004/vendee2004/index.html

—————————————————————-

4.Vendee Globe Race 2000/01

Start 11.November Les Sables de Olonne

 

Round-The-World: alle vier Jahre -theoretisch 23.896 Meilen – ostwärts,
nonstop, allein und ohne Unterstützung
Im Jahre 2000 das vierte Mal seit 1989.
Von Les Sables d’Olonne nach Osten, entlang der drei großen Kaps rund um die Antarktis und zurück nach Les Sables d’Olonne. Reparaturen am Schiff durften in Küstennähe – ohne Hilfe von Land – allein durchgeführt werden.
History Vendee Globe
Ausführliche Berichterstattung

Fotogalerie Teil 1

Im Jahr 2000 segelten 24 Skipper aus sechs verschiedenen Nationen diese 26.000 Meilen auf modernsten, unsinkbaren 60ft-Yachten mit ständigem Kontakt zur Rennleitung via Satellitentelefon und e-mail. Über 100 Renntage forderten das Letzte an Fitness, Fähigkeiten und mentaler Kraft von den Wettbewerbern um die symbolträchtigste Trophäe des Segelsports.

Ranking:
1. Michel Desjoyeaux/PRB
2. Ellen Mac Arthur/KINGFISHER
3. Roland Jourdain/SILL
4. Marc Thiercelin/Active Wear
5. Dominique Wavre/Union Bancaire Privée
6. Thomas Coville/SODEBO
7. Mike Golding/TEAM GROUP 4
8. Josh Hall/EBP GARTMORE

DNF
Catherine Chabaud/Whirlpool-7.Platz bis 20.02.01(Vigo)
Ives Parlier/Aquitaine Innovations
Letzter – aber Extremleistung der Sonderklasse
Fedor Konyoukhov/Modern University – krank
Thierry Dubois/Solidaires
Bernar/Voilà.frd Gallay
Patrice Carpentier/VM Matériaux
Joe Seeten/Nord Pas de Calais
Raphaël Dinelli/Sogal Extenso
Simone Bianchetti/Aquarelle.com
Javier Sanso/Old Spice
Pascuale de Gregorio/Wind
Didier Munduteguy/DDP – 60ème Sud

Rennverlauf:
Michel Desjoyeaux/PRB, genannt „der Professor“ fuhr überlegen einen Start-/Zielsieg heraus und musste den Ruhm und Jubel der Fans der jungen Ellen Mac Arthur überlassen, die ihre hervorragende sportliche und seemännische Leistung mit einer hautnahen, Mitgefühl erregenden Berichterstattung verbinden konnte; so wurde sie der eigentliche Star des Vendee Globe 2000/2001.

16.03.2001, 14:47
Yves Parlier hat 14:47 nach 126 Tagen mit gebrochenem Mast die Ziellinie des Vendee Globe überfahren! Nachdem er die Ziellinie passiert hatte, schlang er ein zugeworfenes Baguette und einen Schokoriegel herunter. Seine ersten Eindrücke: Ich muß jetzt erst wieder lernen wie frisches Fleisch und Käse schmecken. Als ich den Horizont nach etwas Eßbarem

12.02.2001 00:25
Ellen fährt unter dem Jubel von Zehntausenden Begeisterten um 20:36,40 über die Ziellinie.
Keinem Segler/Seglerin wurde bisher ein solche emotionale Zuneigung zuteil. Mit 24 allein um die Welt, haarscharf an einem Eisberg „vorbeigeschrammt“, mehrmals im 28m hohen Mast zur Reparatur von Rigg und Instrumenten, eine oft alles überfordernde Müdigkeit und die rationale Klarheit der Gedanken beim Blick auf die Wetterkarten – das waren Leistungen, die ihresgleichen suchen. Deshalb genießt sie auch die uneingeschränkte Hochachtung Ihrer Regattawettbewerber, die meisten davon „alte Hasen“ im besten Alter und mit weit mehr Erfahrungen…

10.02.2001
94.Tag = Tag des Siegers Michel Desjoyeaux(PRB)
20:08 hat Michel Desjoyeaux die Ziellinie passiert!
Er segelte am letzten Tag dieses Nonstoprennens rund um die Welt vor einer Kaltfront mit 17kn Fahrt bei 20-30kn Südwind. Ein Sonderbericht in abgekürzter Tagebuchform in der victorystory von Michel Ellen Mac Arthur hat wegen ihres Stagbruches und der dadurch erzwungenen geringen Segelfläche weiter Meilen auf Michel verloren (295sm), hat aber den Dritten- Roland Jourdain – noch 713 Meilen hinter sich.

09.02.2001
Ellen MacArthur herself was low in moral again after suffering yet another setback in the final run to the finish. „I don’t have a boat which works at 100% because I’ve broken the genoa stay. It happened two days ago: the stay broke when I was furling in the sails to head closer to the wind. Yesterday I sailed with one reef and the solent nearly all day, which explains why I’ve dropped back in miles behind Michel. I couldn’t put up full index sail, because if there had been any further problems it could affect the stability of the mast. In just these last three weeks I’ve hit a container, broken a rudder, and now the stay…!“

29.01.2001
Ellen Mac Arthur hat am Äquator die Führung übernommen! Große Überraschung im Hauptquartier, als die Positionsmeldungen hereinkamen. Michel hatte die Doldrums erreicht und keinen Wind mehr. Bei 3kn Fahrt konnte er die Dinge nicht mehr beeinflussen sondern nur versuchen so schnell wie möglich aus diesem Windloch herauszukommen. Nur noch 26 Meilen trennten ihn am 28.01.,03:34PM von Ellen. 18 Stunden später – heute um 09:47 meldete Ellen Mac Arthur, daß sie die Führung mit 3 Meilen Abstand auf Michel übernommen hat.Sie relativiert ihren Erfolg allerdings mit der realistischen Feststellung, daß Michel nordwestlich von ihr ist – dort wo das Tor durch die Doldrums zu sein scheint. Auch Bilou(SILL) befindet sich zwar 200 Meilen südlich aber in einer guten Position zum Wind. Ellen meint, es sei jetzt die härteste Phase des Rennens gekommen.
Ellen Mac Arthur 2000

Ellen und der Eisberg

Eisbergallee im Südpazifik

Schlafmanagment

Ellen in den Tropen

Start Vendee 2000
12.01.2001
Ellen Mac Arthur ist als Zweite bei 30kn Wind um Kap Hoorn am 12.01.01, 19:53 gesurft. Damit hat sie mit ihrer Kingfisher die Welt einmal umsegelt, weil sie bereits im April 2000 von Kap Hoorn allein nach Hause gesegelt ist. Ihr mentales Tief der letzten Tage – als die Strecke zum Kap nicht enden wollte – hat sie überwunden. Trotzdem ist sie auch jetzt noch gestreßt – nach 20 Segelwechseln, weil der Wind plötzlich eingeschlafen ist. Sie ist zwar 2 Tage 46 min hinter Desjoyeaux aber immer noch 2 Tage 17 Std.24min schneller als Rekordhalter Ch.Auguin vor vier Jahren.

06.01.2001
Wie kann man bei 8 Grd.Außentemeratur einen gebrochenen Mast laminieren?
Ph.Jeantot(HQ) berichtet in seiner Tagesanalyse von den Versuchen Y.Parlier’s beim Wiederaufbau seines 18m-Havarie-Mastes die Temperatur an der Laminierstelle auf 30 Grad zu bringen. Die eine Lösung: mit Überlebenswesten umwickeln und diese mit 5 Taschenlampenbatterien je 25 Watt aufheizen. Lösung 2: Schläuche dorthin verlegen und mit dem Motorkühlwasser aufheizen. Jeantot meint, daß Parlier schon jetzt eine Goldmedaille verdient hat.

05.01.2001 Michel Desjoyeaux startet seine Maschine mit Windkraft Nachdem sein Anlasser verbrannt war, bekam Michel echte Energieprobleme. In einer „Apollo13“-ähnlichen Aktion mit Heimatunterstützung wurde folgendes Verfahren entwickelt, das nun funktioniert: Wie beim Außenborder ist eine Leine um den Anlasser gewickelt und das andere Ende am Großbaum befestigt. Dann wird der Baum mittschiffs genommen – und wenn dann die Großschot losgelassen wird, rauscht der Baum raus und startet dabei die Maschine!! Klingt einfach, ist aber bei 20kn Seitenwind nicht einfach. Michel ist nun beruhigt, im Notfall mit dieser Prozedur seine Batterien wieder laden zu können.
Ellen Mac Arthur:“Ich bin Zweite!?? – Großartig!! Es ist wirklich toll!

03.01.01
Ellen Mac Arthur hat 10 Eisberge gesehen
70-900 Meter lang, in einer Linie mit einer Meile Abstand. Sie mußte nach Norden wenden und von Hand zwischen dem 5. und 6. hindurchmanövrieren, nur um den 7.und 8.Eisberg sehen zu können, von denen der 7. der größte war. Und sie weiß, daß Eisberge überwiegend nicht vom Radar erfaßt werden! Doch sie beschreibt begeistert die Schönheit und das Farbspiel des 7.Eisberges. Sie muß ständig nach sog. Growlwern, abgebrochenen kleineren Eisbergbrocken Ausschau halten.

24.Dezember 2000
Alle haben von ihren Familien kleine Geschenke mitbekopmmen und Roland hat sogar ein Santa Claus Kostüm angezogen und Videos gemacht. Festmahle und Drinks verschönern diese Tage, die keinen der Segler unberührt lassen. Der größte Moment wird für sie sein, einige Minuten per Satellit mit ihren Familien sprechen zu können. Draußen sind 4Grd Wasser und 5Grd Lufttemperatur, drinnen nur 7Grd.
Ellen Mac Arthur mußte zum zweiten Mal in den 25m hohen Mast. Sie schrieb gerade ihre Weihnachtsgrüße an die Heimat, als ihr 6.Sinn meldete, daß gleich etwas Böses passieren würde… Und prompt brach das Spifall ohne Vorwarnung! Das Code 5 Segel ging in den Bach – es war das Reservesegel, denn das erste wurde schon im Atlantik zerstört. Erst nach 45 Minuten hatte sie es wieder an Deck – völlig erschöpft. 22:30 meldete sie nach Frankreich, daß sie jetzt in den 25m Hohen Mast steigen wird um ein neues Fall einzuziehen – fast ein Abschiedsgruß – denn sie war ja schon eine Woche vorher oben gewesen und hing einen Moment nur noch mit einer Hand am Mast!! Nach 4 Stunden rief sie wieder an und meldete die erfolgreiche Reparatur.

19.12.00, 12:46
Parlier hatte Mastbruch am frühen Montag Morgen!! Beim Eintauchen in eine riesige Welle brach der Mast 6m unterhalb der Spitze. Ellen Mac Arthur und Dominique Wavre wurden angewiesen evtl. Hilfe zu leisten, was jedoch nicht nötig war. Parlier segelt nun mit 4 Reffs im Großsegel weiter.

16.12.00, 17:45 PM
Wildes Surfen der Flotte von jetzt noch 19 Yachten kurz vor den Kerguelen Islands. Das Rennen ist jetzt genau zu dem geworden, was sich die Leute vorstellen – es läuft in einem infernailischen Rhythmus. „Ein Fehler und die Flotte wartet nicht mehr auf dich!“ Dramatische Minuten für Ellen Mac Arthur bei Reparatur im Mast bei 40kn Wind und mehr als 20kn Fahrt. Es war die schlimmste Zeit ihres Lebens!!

12.12.2000
Ellen Mac Arthur(Kingfisher) – z.Zt. wieder 4.Platz – berichtet in ihrer letzten Email von ihrem Schlafmanagment, das durch die Ereignisse manchmal durcheinandergebracht wird. Die Grafik zeigt die über die Tag- und Nachtperioden verteilten theor. kurzen Schlafpausen, eines der größten Probleme bei einer Solo-Umrundung.

08.12.2000
Ellen Mac Arthur(Platz 4) hätte beinahe einen kleinen Eisberg gerammt.
Alle Skipper der Flotte wurden benachrichtigt und nahmen regen Anteil. Bei nur noch 2 Grad Wassertemperatur nimmt Ellen den Kurs -den Isobaren raumschots folgend – nun etwas nördlicher. Am Abend vorher feierte sie noch -online- zusammen mit 350 Skippern des Royal Ocean Race Clubs. Sie war am Kartentisch eingenickt und wurde von einem kalten Luftzug geweckt, als sie in Bootslängenabstand einen Growler vorbeiziehen sah. Geistesgegenwärtig fotografierte sie den Bösewicht, der vom Radar nicht gemeldet worden war ! 2 Std. später war dieses Foto online und weltweit zu sehen… Damit war das mediale 21. Jahrhundert eingeläutet !

Die aktuellen Positionen, 01.12.00, 14:00 UT
1. Aquitaine Innovations – Parlier(FRA) -34.18S/18.12W
2. PRB – Michel Desjoyeaux(FRA) -33.11/17.54
3. SILL – Roland Jourdain(FRA) -32.38/20.19
4. WHIRLPOOL – Catherine Chabaud(FRA) -30.07/19.27
5. Kingfisher – Ellen MacArthur(UK) -30.3/19.27
6. SODEBO – Thomas Coville(FRA) -29.24/21.06
7. Union Bancaire Privee – Wavre(FRA) -29.51/21.06
8. Active Wear – Thiercelin(FRA) -29.32/23.07
9. Solidaires – Dubois(FRA) -29.23/22.13
10.EBP GARTMORE – Josh Hall(UK) -28.27/22.43
11.Voila.fr – Gallay(SUI) -26.25/25.08

24.November 2000
Die ersten 9 Skipper haben den Äquator überfahren. Nach 16 Tagen haben 3 Boote aufgegeben, darunter Bernard Stamm(Armor Lux).Die übrigen 21 Boote trennen max 1900nm.

Mike Golding hatte bereits am 2.Tag Mastbruch und musste zurück.

November 09, 2000 – 7:50:43 PM
24 internationale Skipper starteten um 16:11 in Les Sables d’Olonne unter tiefschwarzem Hiommel – aber bei nur 5kn Wind – nach 4 Tagen Startverschiebung wegen schlechter Wetterbedingungen. zur 4.Ausgabe des Vendee Globe Race.
Copyright © 1996-2000 – SEGEL.DE

http://www.segel.de/oceanracing-2000/vendee2000/index.html

Ranking:
1. Michel Desjoyeaux/PRB
2. Ellen Mac Arthur/KINGFISHER
3. Roland Jourdain/SILL
4. Marc Thiercelin/Active Wear
5. Dominique Wavre/Union Bancaire Privée
6. Thomas Coville/SODEBO
7. Mike Golding/TEAM GROUP 4
8. Josh Hall/EBP GARTMORE

DNF
Catherine Chabaud/Whirlpool-7.Platz bis 20.02.01(Vigo)
Ives Parlier/Aquitaine Innovations
Letzter – aber Extremleistung der Sonderklasse
Fedor Konyoukhov/Modern University – krank
Thierry Dubois/Solidaires
Bernar/Voilà.frd Gallay
Patrice Carpentier/VM Matériaux
Joe Seeten/Nord Pas de Calais
Raphaël Dinelli/Sogal Extenso
Simone Bianchetti/Aquarelle.com
Javier Sanso/Old Spice
Pascuale de Gregorio/Wind
Didier Munduteguy/DDP – 60ème Sud


Geschichte des Vendee Globe
Round-The-World: ostwärts, nonstop, allein und ohne Unterstützung
Von Les Sables d’Olonne nach Osten, entlang der drei großen Kaps, rund um Welt und zurück nach Les Sables d’Olonne. Alles Einhand-Nonstop und ohne Assistenz. Unter allen Bedingungen gewinnt nur der Schnellste – und das ohne Schaden.
1895 verließ Joshua Slocum auf seiner 37-Fuß-Sloop „Spray“ den Hafen von Boston – und nachdem er in drei wilden Jahren 46.000 Meilen und die drei Kaps hinter sich gebracht hatte, ging er in Newport wieder vor Anker. Es war die erste Einhand-Weltumsegelung der Geschichte!
Es sollte bis 1930 dauern, daß der Zweite, Alain Gerbault, auf einem 12-Schiff die Welt allein in sechs Jahren umsegelte. 1966 vollendete der gehandicapte Sir Francis Chichester auf seiner „Gipsy Moth II“ die Welt in 226 Tagen – mit nur einem stoppover in Sydney. Die Welt verbeugte sich in Ehrfurcht.
Der populäre Erfolg regte die Sunday Times an, den Golden Globe zu stiften für das erste Einhand-Nonstoprennen um die Welt. Die Segler nahmen die Herrausforderung an und segelten auf 9-13m-Yachten um die Kaps.

In den 70ern fielen die bisherigen Rekorde, die Bootstechnologie entwickelte sich weiter – ebenso die Vorbereitungen der Skipper. 1970 segelte erstmals der Engländer Chay Blyth von Ost nach West , d.h. in der entgegengesetzten oder „falschen“ Richtung. 1973 war Alain Colas der erste Skipper auf einem Multihull-Boot und schaffte es in 169 Tagen. 1989 drückte der Amerikaner Dodge Morgan diesen Rekord auf 150 Tage herunter. Doch dann brach der Franzose Philippe Monet diesen Rekord abermals mit seiner Brest-to-Brest-time von 129 Tagen. Doch war das Ende der Fahnenstange noch nicht erreicht. 1989 segelte Olivier de Kersauson den Kurs trotz einiger Mißgeschicke in 125 Tagen.
Das ließ die Briten nicht ruhen, die parallel hierzu 1982 den BOC Challenge kreierten – ein neues Einhand-Round-the-world-Race mit Einrumpfyachten, bei dem vier stopovers in Newport- The Cape – Sydney und Rio eingelegt wurden. Ein Newcomer, Philippe Jeantot, ließ alle anderen auf jedem Streckenabschnitt hinter sich und kam nach 159 Tagen- 11 Tage vor seinem nächsten Konkurrenten am Ziel an.
1986 wiederholte Jeantot beim zweiten BOC Challenge seinen Erfolg. In einer feucht-fröhlichen Nacht entschieden sie sich einmütig eines Tages auf ihren eigenen Booten, nonstop und ohne Assistenz diesen schönen Planeten zu umsegeln. Jeantot hat diesen Traum Wirklichkeit werden lassen, in dem Mensch und Maschine bis ans Limit beansprucht werden und in dem er selbst erfolgreich war.
Das erste Rennen hatte 13 Teilnehmer in Les Sables am Start, von denen nur sieben das Rennen nach den Regeln beendeten. Der Gewinner, Tituan Lamazou schaffte es in 109 Tagen.
Im November 1992 starteten 14 Männer zum zweiten Rennen und wieder beendeten nur sieben diese Herausforderung – Alan Gaultier siegte in 110 Tagen, doch wurde die Siegesfeier überschattet durch den verlust von Nigel Burgess einen Monat nach dem Start. Dieses Unheil wiederholte sich 1996. Gerry Rouls blieb auf See, 3 wurden gerettet, weniger als die Hälfte schaffte es zum Zielhafen, doch der Sieger stellte mit 105 Tagen einen neuen Rekord auf und Catherine Chabaud war die erste Frau, die dieses Rennen beendete.
In diesem Jahr wird dieses Rennen fortgesetzt und es ist populärer denn je. Neue Sicherheitsregeln wurden geschaffen, und die Skipper sind noch besser qualifiziert.
Quelle: www.vendeeglobe.com + Peter Rusch – www.kingfisher-challenges.com

Copyright © 1996-2000 – SEGEL.DE – Impressum